Vehicle damage from hitting an animal is more than 3.5 times as common in November as in August.

Although there are deer-vehicle collisions all year round, keep in mind spring and autumn are peak times for deer-related accidents. October through December is prime deer mating and migrating season, so drivers need to be more alert doing these months.

Across the UK it is estimated that there could be up to 74,000 deer-related motor vehicle accidents this year alone, resulting in 400 to 700 human injuries and 20 deaths.

Senior principle environmental advisor at Highways England, Tony Sangwine said:

With some 2 million deer living wild in the UK, newly qualified and city drivers are asked to take extra precaution when venturing onto unfamiliar roads, especially those in more rural areas.

Highways England’s advice on staying safe is:

Senior principle environmental advisor at Highways England, Tony Sangwine said:

Safety is our top priority, which is why we care about people’s journeys. We are working with The Deer Initiative to warn motorists about the risks caused by deer, when they suddenly appear on the road, particularly at both dawn and dusk.

With most deer movement coinciding with key commuting hours, we are urging drivers to be more aware during this time of year so that they can complete their journeys safely and without incident.

With some 2 million deer living wild in the UK, newly qualified and city drivers are asked to take extra precaution when venturing onto unfamiliar roads, especially those in more rural areas.

Tips to Avoid Deer-Vehicle Collisions

Drive with caution. Drive with caution especially in marked deer-crossing zones and along roads surrounded by farmland or forests.

Be aware of times. Be especially attentive around dawn and dusk. Deer tend to be particularly active between 6 – 9 p.m. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions. This is of course the time when low sun can also blind a driver.

Use high beams. Make sure to use your high beams when possible for night time driving. High beams will better illuminate the deer’s eyes on or near the road.

However be aware of other road users and dip your beam when approaching oncoming traffic.

Know their behaviour. Keep in mind that deer tend to travel in herds and in a single file. If you see one deer, there are likely to be more behind it.

Be safe. Always wear your seat belt. Pretty obvious nowadays but there will always be a few.

What to do in the event of an unavoidable accident

If you determine a crash is unavoidable, keep these in mind:

Don’t swerve. Stay in your lane so you don’t move into the path of another vehicle or lose control of yours.

Brake. Be sure to brake firmly and hold onto the steering wheel.

Put on your Hazard lights

Take care if approaching the animal if alive as it may respond aggressively

Call the Police.

Remain calm. Bring your vehicle to a controlled stop and take the appropriate necessary actions. Call the police to report the accident. Collision with a deer or another animal is typically covered under the comprehensive portion of your vehicle insurance.

 

 

Originally posted 2017-10-12 18:12:02.